Whether you’re a Sourdough or a Cheechako, you know that getting ready to go to a place you have not seen yet it’s worth obtaining some legitimate regional recommendations. The state of Alaska is widely considered a region where the challenge of sustainable travel and tourism is crucial. Due to the repute as being a unique option, travel agencies are passionate about Alaskan excursions. Do you believe there is a very best vacation destination?

traveling to Alaska

A Visit To Alaska



At times obtaining local coverage is far more valuable than illustrated sales brochure descriptions. A fresh relevant post is making the rounds following that the team determined it should be re-shared. One thing that stands out are reports that feature complete content. This definitive post is focused on facts to look for if checking out Alaskan tourist attractions.

Our reporter is trying to learn more about the Anchorage priests named in a sexual misconduct review. Can you help?

was written by AKPM Staff , 2020-01-20 01:11:12

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Bishop Andrew E. Bellisario, C.M., the Apostolic Administrator of Anchorage, gives a press conference on the subject of priests and other church employees on January 16, 2020 at the Archdiocese of Anchorage building. (Valerie Kern/Alaska Public Media)

Alaska Public Media reporter Tegan Hanlon is trying to learn more about the 14 men — nearly all of them priests — who worked for the Archdiocese of Anchorage and who church officials now say were known to have sexually abused children and vulnerable adults.

The archdiocese released the men’s names last week after a months-long review of church records. (Find the names here.) The men served across Southcentral Alaska, dating back as far as 1966, when the archdiocese was created. Many are now dead. None were convicted of crimes in Alaska.

As Alaska Public Media continues to report on this issue, we want your to help inform our coverage. If you knew these priests during their time in Alaska and you’d be willing to share your memories with a reporter, on or off the record, please contact Tegan Hanlon at [email protected] or 907-550-8447.

Related stories:

Review finds evidence of sexual misconduct by 14 people in the Anchorage Archdiocese since 1966

‘It’s never, ever been your fault’: Alaska bishop offers apology in wake of report on sexual abuse

Diocese of Juneau finds ‘credible evidence’ of sexual misconduct by Southeast Alaska priests






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a visit to Alaska

Traveling To Alaska, the 49th State

Oftentimes the more enlightening material are not all encompassing abstract studies but personal reviews featuring individuals and small communities. Yet, unexpectedly frequently it’s the large institutions offering the more interesting and enlightening accounts. Needless to say there is also a role for travel and tourism statistical data or policy analysis. Posts about a trip to Alaska such as Our reporter is trying to learn more about the Anchorage priests named in a sexual misconduct review. Can you help? help us to study the far reaching potential of sustainable travel.

In accordance with many different surveys for the most part travelers choose sustainable tourism and wish to be responsible travelers. Alaska is a place where sustainable travel and tourism is critically important.

Travel specialist favorite sightseeing for people heading to Alaska includes

Tongass National Forest. The Tongass is actually the biggest national forest in the United States. It was given it’s name from the Tongass Clan of the Tlingit native people and dates back to 1902 when President Theodore Roosevelt established the Alexander Archipelago Forest Reserve. In 1908 the forest was renamed and expanded and currently the 16.9 million-acre Tongass National Forest runs from the Pacific ocean to the large inland ice fields that border British Columbia and from the southern tip of Prince of Wales Island to Malaspina Glacier five hundred miles to the north. Approximately 80 percent of Southeast Alaska is in Tongass and with its thousands of islands, fjords and bays the national forest offers 11,000 miles of shoreline. Tongass’ large coastal rain forest includes towering hemlock, spruce and red and yellow cedar. The undergrowth beneath themassive conifers is made up of young evergreens and shrubs such as devil’s club, blueberry and huckleberry. Moss and ferns cover the ground, and lichens adorn many trees and rocks.

Wildlife is plentiful all through Tongass. Sitka blacktail deer and it’s two main predators, wolf and brown bear, are found here. Black bear are common as well as mountain goats and some moose. Marine mammals discovered along the shores include Dall and harbor porpoises, seals and humpback, minke and orca whales and a growing population of sea otters. The rich waters teem with fish such as halibut and all five species of Pacific salmon. More bald eagles live in this region than in any other place in the world. Though the place to find the world’s main temperate rain forest, almost half of Tongass is covered by ice, water, wetlands and rock. It’s most widley known ice floe is the Mendenhall Glacier, Alaska’s “Drive-in glacier” since it is just 13 miles from down-town Juneau along a paved road. A boat trip through Petersburg or Wrangell brings people near the face of LeConte Glacier, the southernmost tidewater glacier on the continent. Just 30 miles north of Yakutat is Hubbard Glacier, the longest tidewater glacier in the world and very easily Alaska’s most energetic. The 76-mile-long glacier has crossed Russell Fjord several times, lately in 2008. The rip tides and currents that flow in front of the 8-mile-wide glacier are so powerful they trigger Hubbard to calve almost constantly. The Tongass features nineteen wilderness areas, including the 545-sq-mile Russell Fjord Wilderness, as well as Admiralty Island National Monument and Misty Fiords National Monument. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve and the general area around Haines and Skagway are not part of the national forest.

visiting Tongass National Forest in Alaska

A Visit To Tongass National Forest in Alaska